All Posts By

blackbearflooringmedia@gmail.com

Black Cherry

By | Hard Wood Flooring Species | No Comments

Appearance

Color: Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown, lustrous; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Color darkens over time.

Grain: Fine, frequently wavy, uniform texture. Distinctive flake pattern on true quartersawn surfaces. Texture is satiny, with some gum pockets.

Variations: Significant color variation between boards.

Workability

Sawing/Machining: Good machining qualities.

Sanding: Sands satisfactorily if the correct sanding sequence is followed.

Nailing: No known problems.

Finishing: No known problems.

Comments Origin: North America

Properties

Hardness/Janka: 950 (softest species Black Bear Carries); 26% softer than Northern red oak.

Dimensional Stability: Above average (7.1; 17% more stable than Northern red oak)

Hickory

By | Hard Wood Flooring Species | No Comments

Appearance

Color: Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish; sapwood is white to cream, with fine brown lines.

Grain: Hickory is closed, with moderate definition; somewhat rough-textured.

Variations: In hickory there are often pronounced differentiations in color between spring wood and summer wood.

Workability

Sawing/Machining: Hickory’s density makes it difficult to machine and work with hand tools.

Sanding: Difficult to sand because of density, and because light color makes sander markers show more than on darker woods.

Nailing: Has a tendency to split the tongues.

Finishing: May be difficult to stain

Comments Origin: North America

Properties

Hardness/Janka: 1820; (41% harder than Northern red oak).

Dimensional Stability: average (8.9; 3% less stable than Northern red oak).

Durability: Extremely dense and durable, High shock absorption.

Availability: Readily available.

Maple

By | Hard Wood Flooring Species | No Comments

Appearance

Color: Maple hardwood varies in color from white to medium brown (Cream to light reddish-brown). When sorted for a clear grade some if not all of the brown color is pulled.

Grain: Hard maple has a close fine, uniform texture and is generally straight-grained with a natural luster. Hard maple can exhibit a bird’s-eye or burl grain. Bird’s-eye grain resembles small circular or elliptical figures. Clusters of round curls are known as burl.

Variations: In Maple there is soft color variations to heavy variation with the brown and mineral deposits. When stained, the grain appears very minimally and produces an even tone.

Workability: Hard maple ranks highly on the Janka Hardness Scale As a result, pre-boring is recommended when nailing and screwing hard maple hardwood.

Sawing/Machining: Good machining qualities. It can machine though with care, turns well, glues satisfactorily.

Sanding: No known problems.

Nailing: No known problems.

Finishing: Takes stain satisfactorily and polishes well. When stained, the grain appears very minimally and produces an even tone.

Comments Origin: North America.

Properties

Hardness/Janka: 1450 Maple is commonly used for mall & gym floors due to its durabitliy and wear properties.

Dimensional Stability: Above average. Heavy, hard, strong, close-grained and possesses a uniform texture. Hard maple has excellent resistance to abrasion and wear, making it ideal flooring for higher-traffic areas.

Red Oak

By | Hard Wood Flooring Species | No Comments

Appearance

Color: Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak.

Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies.

Variations: Over 200 subspecies in North America; great variation in color and grain, depending on the origin of the wood and differences in growing seasons. Northern, Southern and Appalachian red oak can all be divided into upland and lowland species.

Workability

Sawing/Machining: Above average in all machining operations.

Sanding: Sands satisfactorily if the correct sanding sequence is followed.

Nailing: No known problems.

Finishing: Stains well & demonstrates strong stain contrast. Red oak generally works better than white for bleached floors because it is more porous, and because tannins in white oak can discolor the floor.

Comments Origin: North America

Properties

Hardness/Janka: 1290 Northern (benchmark). Southern: 1060; 18% softer than Northern red oak.

Dimensional Stability: Northern: average (8.6). Southern: below average (11.3; 31% less stable than Northern red oak.

Availability: Easily available.

Black Walnut

By | Hard Wood Flooring Species | No Comments

Appearance

Color: Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great – Lightens over time

Grain: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or curly grain. Arrangements of pores are similar to hickory, but pores are smaller in size.

Variations Within Species And Grades: Great variety of color and figure within species, as well as variation in color among boards, especially in lower grades and from material that isn’t steamed prior to kiln drying.

Workability

Sawing/Machining: Excellent machining qualities.

Sanding: Sands satisfactorily.

Nailing: No known problems.

Finishing: No known finish problems.

Comments Frequently used as a highlight material for borders or other inlay techniques. Origin: North America

Properties

Hardness/Janka: 1010; (22% softer than Northern red oak).

Dimensional Stability: Average (7.8; 9% more stable than Northern red oak).

Durability: Moderately dense, very strong, good shock resistance. Not as dent-resistant as oak.

Availability: Moderately available.

White Oak

By | Hard Wood Flooring Species | No Comments

Appearance

Color: Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; White oak tends to be a bit browner, darker and more yellow than red oak.

Grain: Open, slightly less coarse than red oak.. Plain sawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; rift sawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quarter sawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. White oak has a bit of a smoother look than red oak.

Variations: Over 200 subspecies in North America; great variation in color and grain, depending on the origin of the wood and differences in growing seasons.

Workability

Sawing/Machining: Above average in all machining operations.

Sanding: Sands satisfactorily if the correct sanding sequence is followed.

Nailing: No known problems.

Finishing: Stains well & demonstrates strong stain contrast.

Comments Origin: North America

Properties

Hardness/Janka: 1360 White oak flooring is a bit harder than red oak. On the Janka hardness scale, White oak is 1360 and red oak is 1290.

Dimensional Stability: Northern: average.

Availability: Varies in availability.

Why are there gaps in between the boards on my floor?

By | Frequently Asked Questions | No Comments

During the summer months of the year, there is a lot of humidity in the air. Your hardwood floor soaks up this humidity and expands. As the winter months roll around, and the heat is turned on, the floor dries out and starts to gap. There are a couple of tips we recommend to try and avoid this problem. Try to keep the room at a constant 45% humidity level using an air conditioner, humidifier, or a dehumidifier. Also, prior to installation, let your floor acclimate to its surroundings. Two weeks before the floor is to be laid, bring the flooring into the area where the floor is to be installed. Stack the flooring 3-4 bundles high leaving a 6″-7″ space between the stacks. This will allow air to circulate between the stacks and for your flooring to properly acclimate.